Rare Stomps-Burkhardt Company North Wind Greek God Throne Chair
Current Bid: $ 1,250.00  
 

For sale is a rare piece of American history.  On the head rest of this throne chair is a carved depition of the Greek god of the north wind, Boreas. This chair was produced around the turn of the century by The Stomps-Burkhardt Company of Dayton, Ohio.  The company operated between 1890 and 1928. The shape of the chair and the carved face on the backrest might seem unusual, but similar chairs were actually common in late-19th-century homes.  The shape of the chair was originally inspired by ancient Egyptian folding stools. These chairs had an X-shaped base and a curved seat. These simple folding stools inspired designers in 15th century Italy to resurrect the style and rename their folding stools Savonarola chairs. Curule chairs descended from seats reserved for high-ranking officials of the Roman Empire. Curule chairs were similar in design, but were not foldable and had a solid framework. The Curule chair continued to develop and flourish across Europe after the 15th century. The X-shaped chair came to the U.S. in the early 1800s as part of the American fascination with French style and furniture. 

On Dec-08-11 at 08:31:37 PST, seller added the following information:

For sale is a rare piece of American history. On the head rest of this throne chair is a carved depiction of the Greek god of the north wind, Boreas. This face and similar visages became popular on chair backs during the early part of the 19th century with a resurgence of interest in the Gothic Revival. Chairs featuring his image were called North Wind or Old Man North chairs. A face carved onto a chair was thought to ward away evil spirits. Despite the somewhat intimidating appearance, superstitious owners may have found them to be comforting rather than malicious. This Mahogany chair was produced around the turn of the century by The Stomps-Burkhardt Company of Dayton, Ohio. The company operated between 1890 and 1928. The shape of the chair and the carved face on the backrest might seem unusual, but similar chairs were actually common in late-19th-century homes. The shape of the chair was originally inspired by ancient Egyptian folding stools. These chairs had an X-shaped base and a curved seat. These simple folding stools inspired designers in 15th century Italy to resurrect the style and rename their folding stools Savonarola chairs. Curule chairs descended from seats reserved for high-ranking officials of the Roman Empire. Curule chairs were similar in design, but were not foldable and had a solid framework. The Curule chair continued to develop and flourish across Europe after the 15th century. The X-shaped chair came to the U.S. in the early 1800s as part of the American fascination with French style and furniture.

On Dec-08-11 at 08:42:58 PST, seller added the following information:

For sale is a rare piece of American history. On the head rest of this throne chair is a carved depiction of the Greek god of the north wind, Boreas. This face and similar visages became popular on chair backs during the early part of the 19th century with a resurgence of interest in the Gothic Revival. Chairs featuring his image were called North Wind or Old Man North chairs. A face carved onto a chair was thought to ward away evil spirits. Despite the somewhat intimidating appearance, superstitious owners may have found them to be comforting rather than malicious. This Mahogany chair was produced around the turn of the century by The Stomps-Burkhardt Company of Dayton, Ohio. The company operated between 1890 and 1928. The shape of the chair and the carved face on the backrest might seem unusual, but similar chairs were actually common in late-19th-century homes. The shape of the chair was originally inspired by ancient Egyptian folding stools. These chairs had an X-shaped base and a curved seat. These simple folding stools inspired designers in 15th century Italy to resurrect the style and rename their folding stools Savonarola chairs. Curule chairs descended from seats reserved for high-ranking officials of the Roman Empire. Curule chairs were similar in design, but were not foldable and had a solid framework. The Curule chair continued to develop and flourish across Europe after the 15th century. The X-shaped chair came to the U.S. in the early 1800s as part of the American fascination with French style and furniture. The dimensions are as follows: 43"Tall x 24"Wide x 19"Deep Please contact me with any questions. Thanks!

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